Why Medicare Should Be Part of Your Retirement Planning

wealth advisors logo

Provided by Craig S. Lundquist, MBA on behalf of Wealth Advisors located at Ideal Credit Union*

Learn more about Wealth Advisors


Why Medicare Should Be Part of Your Retirement Planning

The premiums and coverages vary, and you must realize the differences.

Medicare takes a little time to understand.

As you approach age 65, familiarize yourself with its coverage options and their costs and limitations. Certain features of Medicare can affect health care costs and coverage. Some retirees may do okay with original Medicare (Parts A and B), others might find it lacking and decide to supplement original Medicare with Part C, Part D, or Medigap coverage. In some cases, that may mean paying more for senior health care per month than you initially figured.

How much do Medicare Part A and Part B cost, and what do they cover?

Part A is usually free; Part B is not. Part A is hospital insurance and covers up to 100 days of hospital care, home health care, nursing home care, and hospice care. Part B covers doctor visits, outpatient procedures, and lab work. You pay for Part B with monthly premiums, and your Part B premium is based on your income. In 2018, the basic monthly Part B premium is $134; higher-earning Medicare recipients pay more per month. You also typically shoulder 20% of Part B costs after paying the yearly deductible, which is $183 in 2018.1 The copays and deductibles linked to original Medicare can take a bite out of retirement income. In addition, original Medicare does not cover dental, vision, or hearing care, or prescription medicines, or health care services outside the U.S. It pays for no more than 100 consecutive days of skilled nursing home care. These out-of-pocket costs may lead you to look for supplemental Medicare coverage and to plan other ways of paying for long-term care.1,2

Medigap policies help Medicare recipients with some of these copays and deductibles.

Sold by private companies, these health care policies will pay a share of certain out-of-pocket medical costs (i.e., costs greater than what original Medicare covers for you). You must have original Medicare coverage in place to purchase one. The Medigap policies being sold today do not offer prescription drug coverage. A monthly premium on a Medigap policy for a 65-year-old man may run from $150-250, so keep that cost range in mind if you are considering Medigap coverage.2,3 In 2020, the two most popular kinds of Medigap plans – Medigap C and Medigap F – will vanish. These plans pay the Medicare Part B deductible, and Medigap policies of that type are being phased out due to the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act. Come 2019, you will no longer be able to enroll in them.4

Part D plans cover some (certainly not all) prescription drug expenses.

Monthly premiums are averaging $33.50 this year for these standalone plans, which are offered by private insurers. Part D plans currently have yearly deductibles of less than $500.2,5

Some people choose a Part C (Medicare Advantage) plan over original Medicare.

These plans, offered by private insurers and approved by Medicare, combine Part A, Part B, and usually Part D coverage and often some vision, dental, and hearing benefits. You pay an additional, minor monthly premium besides your standard Medicare premium for Part C coverage. Some Medicare Advantage plans are health maintenance organizations (HMOs); others, preferred provider organizations (PPOs).6

If you want a Part C plan, should you select an HMO or PPO?

About two-thirds of Part C plan enrollees choose HMOs. There is a cost difference. In 2017, the average HMO monthly premium was $29. The average regional PPO monthly premium was $35, while the mean premium for a local PPO was $62.6 HMO plans usually restrict you to doctors within the plan network. If you are a snowbird who travels frequently, you may be out of the Part C plan’s network area for weeks or months and risk paying out-of-network medical expenses from your savings. With PPO plans, you can see out-of-network providers and see specialists without referrals from primary care physicians.6

Now, what if you retire before age 65?

COBRA aside, you are looking at either arranging private health insurance coverage or going uninsured until you become eligible for Medicare. You must also factor this possible cost into your retirement planning. The earliest possible date you can arrange Medicare coverage is the first day of the month in which your birthday occurs.5

Medicare planning is integral to your retirement planning.

Should you try original Medicare for a while? Should you enroll in a Part C HMO with the goal of keeping your overall out-of-pocket health care expenses lower? There is also the matter of eldercare and the potential need for interim coverage (which will not be cheap) if you retire prior to 65. Discuss these matters with the financial professional you know and trust in your next conversation.

Craig S. Lundquist may be reached at 651-773-2757 or This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note - investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

*Securities sold, advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution to make securities available to members. Not NCUA/NCUSIF/FDIC insured, May Lose Value, No Financial Institution Guarantee. Not a deposit of any financial institution.CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc., is a registered broker /dealer in all fifty states of the United States of America.

Citations.

  1. medicare.gov/your-medicare-costs/costs-at-a-glance/costs-at-glance.html [5/21/18]
  2. cnbc.com/2018/05/03/medicare-doesnt-cover-everything-heres-how-to-avoid-surprises.html [5/3/18]
  3. medicare.gov/supplement-other-insurance/medigap/whats-medigap.html [5/21/18]
  4. fool.com/retirement/2018/02/05/heads-up-the-most-popular-medigap-plans-are-disapp.aspx [2/5/18]
  5. money.usnews.com/money/retirement/medicare/articles/your-guide-to-medicare-coverage [5/2/18] 6 - cnbc.com/2017/10/18/heres-how-to-snag-the-best-medicare-advantage-plan.html [10/18/17]

 

Rate this blog entry:
2018 Holiday Hours


New Year's Day
Monday, January 1st
All locations closed.


Martin Luther King Jr Day
Monday, January 15th
All locations closed.


Presidents' Day
Monday, February 19th
All locations closed.


Good Friday
Friday, March 30th
All locations open regular business hours
Lobby - 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Drive-thru - 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.


Memorial Day
Monday, May 28th
All locations closed.


Independence Day
Wednesday, July 4th
All locations closed.


Labor Day
Monday, September 3rd
All locations closed.


Columbus Day
Monday, October 8th
All locations closed.


Veterans Day
Monday, November 12th
All locations closed


Thanksgiving Day
Thursday, November 22nd
All locations closed.


Day after Thanksgiving
All locations are open regular business hours
Lobby - 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Drive-thru - 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.


Christmas Eve
Monday, December 24th
All locations open regular business hours
Lobby - 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Drive-thru - 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.


Christmas Day
Tuesday, December 25th
All locations closed.


New Year's Eve
Monday, December 31
All locations open regular business hours
Lobby - 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Drive-thru - 9:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.


New Years Day
Tuesday, January 1st
All locations closed